Book review: How to be a real-life Superman, through flow hacking

“The Rise of Superman: Decoding the science of ultimate human performance” by Steven Kotler

Some call it “the zone”, others call it their secret formula, scientists call it “the flow.” Record-breaking extreme sports athletes have it, so do Nobel Prize winning academics, military top forces, Fortune 500 CEOs, paranormal researchers, maverick scientists, psychedelic underground, world class artists, adventurers, Bohemian outcasts, start up entrepreneurs, surgeons, chess masters, everyone who are successful in their field got this so-called flow.

It is the difference between life and death for mountain climbers and base jumpers, it is the inspirational floodgate for aspiring writers, the right improv for jazz musicians. It is the one thing that breaks human limitations, that fuels the huge rise of record breaking attempts in all fields in the past few decades. And it’s all hackable for everyone, including you and me, to be as close as humanly possible as a superman.

Backed by massive amount of scientific data sets – from neuroscience to sociology – and breath taking stories to illustrate the examples, this book shows the what, the why, the where, the when, and the how of “flow hacking.” And it’s mind-bendingly incredible.